Technology

The basic equip­ment of the Lap­pen tree nurs­ery includes inno­v­a­tive machines which make up a large fleet. Spe­cial har­vest­ing machines and in-house inven­tions such as the root bar­ri­er machine, cut­ter bar and bind­ing machine ensure that plants are treat­ed gen­tly. GPS-con­trolled plant­i­ng machines facil­i­tate the effi­cient plan­ning and imple­men­ta­tion of the pro­duc­tion steps.

The port­fo­lio also includes the cut­ting edge “root­ball lifter” which, togeth­er with var­i­ous car­ri­er vehi­cles, is capa­ble of mechan­i­cal­ly lift­ing root­balls mea­sur­ing between 40 and 250 cm. This takes place up to eight times per tree. It allows the plants to be trans­plant­ed to a dif­fer­ent loca­tion where they can devel­op new fibre roots.  The root­ball cloths used by The Lap­pen tree nurs­ery, which are made of hes­s­ian and wire bas­kets of fast-biodegrad­able mate­r­i­al to assist in this growth.

Dur­ing plant­i­ng these are not removed, there­by pre­vent­ing the root­ball from falling apart and pro­mot­ing the pro­duc­tion of new fibrous roots. The fact that the roots are auto­mat­i­cal­ly cut dur­ing the trans­plan­ta­tion process also leads to strong and vig­or­ous root growth. Reg­u­lar selec­tion, trans­plant­i­ng and prun­ing ensures that the trees are con­di­tioned for grow­ing quick­ly and sus­tain­ably after they have been trans­plant­ed to their new location.

Many fac­tors come into play as soon as trees are replant­ed on the fields: first­ly, good prepa­ra­tion of the site is impor­tant to allow the plants to thrive opti­mal­ly and ensure that they can con­tin­ue to be cul­ti­vat­ed to an advanced age. Good soil and sub­soil con­di­tions down to a sig­nif­i­cant depth are essen­tial to guar­an­tee the plants’ growth. The Lap­pen tree nurs­ery imple­ments an effec­tive crop rota­tion pol­i­cy in order to ensure that good soil con­di­tions are main­tained. Areas of fal­low land and flower strips are increas­ing­ly hav­ing a pos­i­tive effect on the plants and ani­mals. Flow­ered areas cur­rent­ly extend to over 10 hectares. Fur­ther­more, sow­ing grass between the rows makes a sig­nif­i­cant con­tri­bu­tion to a good soil struc­ture and offers pro­tec­tion against soil fatigue, as does the type of green manure used.

Inte­grat­ed pest man­age­ment is a com­bi­na­tion of nat­ur­al mea­sures and the spar­ing use of chem­i­cal pes­ti­cides, which pro­tect crops from dis­eases and pests.  After deter­min­ing the dam­age thresh­old, plant pro­tec­tion prod­ucts are used in the tree nurs­ery Lap­pen. The weed con­trol takes place part­ly mechan­i­cal­ly.  The plants only get as much fer­tilis­er as need­ed, this sus­tain­able con­cept leads to a major reduc­tion in the use of N‑fertilisation (max. 19 – 27 kg pure N per ha). The Lap­pen tree nurs­ery avoids fer­til­i­sa­tion with phos­pho­rus com­plete­ly. The tree nursery’s aim is to keep the leach­ing of nutri­ents from the soil – caused by fer­til­i­sa­tion – to the low­est pos­si­ble lev­el, in order to pro­tect the envi­ron­ment. In its endeav­ors in this area, Lap­pen analy­ses a large num­ber of soil sam­ples and, in terms of fer­til­i­sa­tion and pest con­trol, relies not only on its own exper­tise and long-stand­ing know-how, but also seeks the assis­tance of exter­nal con­sul­tants.  The leach­ing of nutri­ents through fer­til­i­sa­tion is kept as low as pos­si­ble. Through these mea­sures, the plants at Lap­pen can ripen; they are robust and are less sus­cep­ti­ble to sec­ondary pests.

The desire for sus­tain­abil­i­ty is also reflect­ed in the selec­tive irri­ga­tion sys­tem using tanker trail­ers, which leads to a reduc­tion in water con­sump­tion. The mod­ern sys­tem of drip irri­ga­tion is used on areas of up to 40 hectares.

The MPS cer­tifi­cate award­ed to Lap­pen also shows that the com­pa­ny places par­tic­u­lar atten­tion on envi­ron­ment-friend­ly pro­duc­tion process­es, low con­sump­tion of resources and sustainability.